GEEKchocolate

  • Increase font size
  • Default font size
  • Decrease font size
Welcome to GEEKchocolate

Alastair Reynolds – Revelations from beyond the Aquila Rift

E-mail

With twelve major novels published since his 2000 debut Revelation Space, shortlisted for both the BSFA and Arthur C Clarke awards, alongside a plethora of short stories and novellas, former astronomer Alastair Reynolds is not only of the most prolific and significant of modern science fiction writers but also one of the most approachable. Attending the Edinburgh International Science Festival to participate in fellow astronomer and novelist Pippa Goldschmidt's event What Scientists Read on April 17th, he was sat with Geek Chocolate for a long chat over coffee and cake to talk about his career, his novels, his future work, the current frontiers of astronomy and a few teases about the forthcoming concluding volume of the Poseidon’s Children trilogy, due 2015.

Read more...
 

Edge of Tomorrow

E-mail

Ostensibly a film with time travel as a central plot device, Edge Of Tomorrow is less influenced by the temporal mechanics of The Time Machine or the paradoxes Looper and is more honestly positioned somewhere between Groundhog Day and Saving Private Ryan. Adapted relatively faithfully by Christopher McQuarrie (Jack the Giant Slayer) and brothers Jez and John-Henry Butterworth from the novel All You Need Is Kill by Hiroshi Sakurazaka with illustrations by Yoshitoshi Abe, the film is directed by Doug Liman, continuing his cinematic evolution which has taken him from Swingers (1996) through The Bourne Identity (2002) to Jumper (2008) and now here.

Read more...
 

I Origins

E-mail

“Every person living on this planet has their own unique pair of eyes,” says Ian Gray, father, husband, scientist: he is bound by what he can observe, measure, categorise, but equally true is that every person on the planet has their own set of experiences, their own unique vision and perspective, and so it is possible for two people to look upon the same thing and yet see something quite different. So it is with the latest film from Mike Cahill, a wide eyed gaze at the contrariness of love and the conflict between faith and science.

Read more...
 

The Maze Runner

E-mail

Riding on the crest of a wave of box-office success in the USA, The Maze Runner now hurtles into multiplexes nationwide, the latest in an increasingly desperate succession of Hunger Games cash-ins, this Young Adult dystopian drama is adapted from the 2009 novel by James Dashner. Taking place mostly in the Glade, a sylvan clearing which is effectively a prison inhabited by a small community of teenage boys surrounded by impassable walls on all four sides, the story begins in medias res with the arrival of Thomas (Teen Wolf’s Dylan O'Brien), the latest in a long line of monthly arrivals.

Read more...
 

Night of the Comet

E-mail

It’s not a typical apocalypse, nor was the inspiration as obvious as the inescapable cold war angst during the escalating tensions between Reagan’s America and the revolving political door of the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics at the time, Brezhnev, Andropov, Chernenko and Gorbachev within a matter of months. Instead, writer and director Thom Eberhardt says the muse for his 1984 feature was actually a romantic comedy released eighteen months previously, director Martha Coolidge's Valley Girl, starring Deborah Foreman and a teenage Nicholas Cage.

Read more...
 

Star Wars Rebels

E-mail

Most often seen as a cinematic venture, Star Wars has not always been an easy fit with television, even though the immediate successor to the global phenomenon of 1977 was a television event, November 1978’s Star Wars Holiday Special which set the tone for all further small screen adventures, focused on the child rather than the family demographic of the films: the two Ewok adventures Caravan of Courage (1984) and The Battle for Endor (1985), the cartoon series Droids and Ewoks (both 1985-1986) and the various Clone Wars iterations (2003-2005 and 2008-2014).

Read more...
 

A Vision of Fire - Gillian Anderson and Jeff Rovin

E-mail

As the first of what we can assume will be many books that chart their way through a far more epic plot in The Earthrend Saga, A Vision Of Fire makes an excellent stand alone tale of political intrigue, mysterious objects; origin unknown, secret groups, philosophical and spiritual discourse and a good old ­fashioned love story tossed in for good measure, all of which keeps you involved.


It is an exciting book immediately and the action is almost cinematic; hardly surprising as Gillian Anderson herself said that she hopes to bring the story to television. If the novel is any yardstick then an on-screen version of A Vision of Fire would make Anderson's take­over of our small screen adaptations increase to stellar proportions.
Read more...
 

Mark of the Devil

E-mail

“I didn’t make it as a horror film, I made it as a statement,” says writer/director Michael Armstrong in the interview accompanying Arrow’s Blu-ray release of Mark of the Devil, the 1970 film which was marketed as "Positively the most horrifying film ever made" and "Rated V for Violence" by the American distributor Hallmark. Filmed in West Germany, a country which now has a pragmatic approach to superstition, it was an international collaboration which allowed content which would not have been allowed by the censors of Britain nor the studios of America, always answerable to their shareholders. Specifically, European cinema would question the complicity of the church in the persecution of women in the middle ages where Hollywouldn’t.

Read more...
 

Space Station 76

E-mail

Science fiction is most often the medium of the future, looking forward to a tomorrow which may be brighter or may be troubled but will certainly be different, changed through a technology which has opened up a new possibility to humanity be it good or bad. Yet science fiction also has the past to explore and an equally valid subgenre is the alternate history, the world as it might have been had a different route been taken, or in the case of the deep space refuelling point Space Station 76, how the solar system might have been had the reality of economics not curtailed the ambition of the space programme.

Read more...
 

Z Nation

E-mail

Do zombies eat the flesh of the dead, or only the living? Given sufficient need, will zombies even feast upon each other? Given the evidence of the pilot episode of SyFy’s Z Nation, there is apparently very little that zombies will not consume and regurgitate wholesale upon the screen given the prompting of a production team boldly aiming to go where many, many have gone before in a cycle of ever decreasing and decomposing returns.

Read more...
 

Dracula Untold

E-mail

It began with The Hunchback of Notre Dame in 1923 and The Phantom of the Opera in 1925, both starring Lon Chaney, based on the novels by Victor Hugo and Gaston Leroux respectively, the first films in the sequence which came to be known as the Universal Monsters, though it was not until 1931 when Bela Lugosi played the title role of Bram Stoker’s Dracula and Boris Karloff appeared in the adaptation of Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein that the series would truly come to be recognised as such, with over seventy films produced through the decades that embraced pulp science fiction as much as literary horror before concluding with The Leech Woman in 1960.

Read more...
 

As Above, So Below

E-mail

Underneath the streets of Paris are located kilometres of catacombs, the burial place of countless number of souls. When a group of mystery investigators decides to enter the largely unexplored and uncharted labyrinth of bones, little they know that they may find more than they were looking for. Directed by John Erick Dowdle, director of Devil (2010) and Quarantine (2009), the English language remake of Jaume Balagueró and Paco Plaza's [REC] (2007), from a script co-written with brother Drew Dowdle, As Above, So Below tries to reach deep into human psyche to discover demons what torments any of us but instead delivers little more than a fairground ghost ride.

Read more...
 
  • «
  •  Start 
  •  Prev 
  •  1 
  •  2 
  •  3 
  •  4 
  •  5 
  •  6 
  •  7 
  •  8 
  •  9 
  •  10 
  •  Next 
  •  End 
  • »


Page 1 of 43

Geeky Tweeting